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2014 Summer Specialist Meeting

NSF-CDI Project —  2014 Specialist Meeting

Human Dynamics in the Mobile Age (HDMA):

New Frontiers of Knowledge Discovery in Cyberspace and Big Data

San Diego State University, San Diego.

August 11, 12 (Monday, Tuesday), 2014

 

This specialist meeting (workshop) is funded by an NSF-CDI project (#1028177, Mapping Cyberspace to Realspace: Visualizing and Understanding the Spatiotemporal Dynamics of Global Diffusion of Ideas and the Semantic Web, http://mappingideas.sdsu.edu/). The goal of this workshop is to foster the multidisciplinary collaboration in related research disciplines, including geography, linguistics, computer science, political science, and communication. The two-day workshop (August 11 and August 12, 2014), organized by San Diego State University, will bring together twelve specialists drawn from the many disciplines with interest in these issues. The workshop will assess the current state of the art, identify and prioritize a research agenda, and begin the development of a research community of collaborating scholars working on these issues. Twelve specialists and scholars will be invited by the NSF project team, consisting of PI Ming-Hsiang Tsou (Geography) and Co-PIs Dipak Gupta (Political Science), Jean Mark Gawron (Linguistics), Brian Spitzberg (Communication), and Li An (Geography). The meeting will include plenary presentations by invited experts, and ample time for small-group discussion of the issues. This workshop will generate a final report published on the project website.  This year, our research theme will be “human dynamics in the mobile age”. Human Dynamics is a transdisciplinary research field for understanding and analyzing dynamic patterns, relationships, narratives, and changes of human activities, behaviors, and communication (credit saindou). The dynamic supply of human dynamics datasets from millions of social media messages, GPS tracks, medical records, wireless sensors, web pages, and cellular phones, becomes an important category of big data.  Specific research questions to be addressed in the workshop may include:

 

  1. 1.    What are the unique characteristics of big data in the context of human dynamics?  Some examples are user-defined credibility, scale-dependent spatial correlation, uneven probability distribution, and dynamic patterns in spatiotemporal analysis.
  2. 2.    What type of innovative research frameworks can help us to collect, analyze, visualize and predict human dynamics via social media and big data?
  3. 3.    What are the limitations of traditional GIS database and spatial statistics in studying human dynamics?
  4. To what extent can data speak for itself in “Big Data” analyses? How accurate can big data be in indicating the mood of society?  How can such indicators be improved?
  5. To what extent should theory drive big data, or big data drive theory—what is the role of theory in relation to big data? Is meme theory falsifiable (or, are any theories in big data scholarship falsifiable), and if so, how should scholarship proceed?
  6. Given time-series and potential nonlinearity of spatial data (big data), what statistical methods, measures or statistics can be used to “dig out” the space-time pattern(s) in human dynamics, and describe/explain/predict such patterns? If we have point data collected over Internet, how to create meaningful continuous information landscape(s) to describe human dynamics?

 

The participants will be invited by the CDI project PI and co-PIs only. The NSF project will cover participants’ travel and lodging costs (but no stipends). Invitees are required to submit a two page resume (bio, NSF style) and a two page position papers for related topics. Each position paper should conform to the following formatting requirements: 1) Arial font type at a size of 10 points or larger; and 2) the margins must be at least one inch on all sides in the letter size.

 

Please submit the two-page resume (bio-sketch) and the two-page position paper to Ming-Hsiang Tsou  mtsou@mail.sdsu.edu by June 15, 2014.  Both position papers and participants’ bio will be published on the project website (http://mappingideas.sdsu.edu).

 

For information about travel arrangement, please email Elie Issa <elieissa333@gmail.com>

PI  and CO-PI

 

Participant List

 

Shih-Lung Shaw
(Bio)
Position Paper
Slides
Dept. of Geography, University of Tennessee

 

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Edna Reid
(Bio)
Intelligence Analysis Program James Madison University
—————————————————
Clay Fink
(Bio)
Slides
 The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory
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LESLIE DAVID SERVI
(Bio)
Slides
The MITRE Corporation
—————————————————
Feng Chen
(Bio)

 Department of Computer Science,
University at Albany
Sumiko R. Mekaru
(Bio)
Slides
 Boston Children’s Hospital

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Pranav Anand
(Bio)
Position Paper
Slides
Department of Linguistics, University of California, Santa Cruz
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Gizem Korkmaz
(Bio)
Slides
Social and Decision Analytics Lab (SDAL) Virgina Bioinformatics Institute
—————————————————
Jin Ruoming
(Bio)
Position Paper
Slides
Computer Science Department, Kent State University
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May Yuan
(Bio)
Slides
College of Atmospheric and Geographic Sciences, University of Oklahoma
K. MICHAEL PEDDECORD
(Bio)
Position Paper
Slides
Graduate School of Public Health, San Diego State University
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Atsushi Nara
(Bio)
Position Paper
Slides
 Geography, San Diego State University
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Eric Buhi
(Bio)
Position Paper
Slides
Graduate School of Public Health, San Diego State University

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Calvin (Chin-Te JUNG)

(Bio)

San Diego State University

Permanent link to this article: http://mappingideas.sdsu.edu/?page_id=865

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